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Mobile Devices: Here's How One Can Safeguard Them

By Enterprise Security Magazine | Wednesday, February 17, 2021

Although it is very enticing to use free Wi-Fi at a coffee shop, airport, or hotel lobby, one should not do it. Whenever one links to another organization's network, they raise the chance of being exposed to ransomware and hackers.

FREMONT, CA: It is difficult for companies to remain safe today, and it is much more challenging now because people are heavily dependent on mobile devices. The mobile threat is higher than ever before. Below are a few key things one needs to do to keep the mobile devices safe.

1. Turn User Authentication On

It is too easy for computers, tablets, and smartphones to get misplaced or robbed when one leaves them in cars, hotels, airplanes, or other public places. The first thing to do is to make sure that all the mobile devices have the screen lock switched on and that they need a password or a PIN to get an entry as there is a lot of useful personal information on the unit.

2. Update the Operating Systems (OS) Regularly

If one is using obsolete apps, there is a chance that they could get hacked. Many vendors are actively delivering security patches to keep ahead of security vulnerabilities. Do not miss the warnings to update the laptop, tablet, or smartphone. To assist with this, make sure the automated app updates are switched on the mobile devices by default. Updating the operating system periodically means that users have the newest security configurations available. When it comes to the laptop, the company's IT department or IT service provider should pish up-to-date applications daily.

3. Avoid Using public Wi-Fi

Although it is very enticing to use free Wi-Fi at a coffee shop, airport, or hotel lobby, one should not do it. Whenever one links to another organization's network, they raise the chance of being exposed to ransomware and hackers. Many online videos and easily accessible software that even an inexperienced hacker can capture Wi-Fi traffic, access sensitive information like credit card numbers, bank account numbers, passwords, and other private data. Interestingly, while public Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are a significant security gap and most people (91 percent) know it, 89 percent of them chose to ignore it.

4. Remote Lock and Data Wipe

Any company should have a BYOD policy that includes a strict remote lock and a data erase policy. Under this scheme, if a mobile computer is suspected of having been hacked or lost, the business retains the right to secure lost information by manually wiping the system or, at the very least, by blocking access.

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